An Orthodox Life

Living a new life of Orthodox Christianity

25 notes

Whatever else may be said about them, the Reformation movements of the sixteenth century were, at root, an attempt to get back to the ‘golden age’ of Christianity. The rallying cry of the Reformers was sola Scriptura! By returning to the Bible — to the Bible alone — they sought to divest Christianity of all accretions and return it to the pristine state of the early Church. The irony is that the principle by which the Reformers sought to return to the purity of the early Church was itself unknown to the early Church. The idea of sola Scriptura was an invention of the sixteenth century. No Father or council of the early Church ever asserted that the Scriptures, in and of themselves, without any reference to the Church, are the all-sufficient rule of faith. The Reformation principle of sola Scriptura was an invention of the Reformation itself.
Clark Carlton, The Way: What Every Protestant Should Know About the Orthodox Church (via gospelofthekingdom)

(via the-violent-take-it-by-force)

44 notes

simplyorthodox:

At Bridegroom Orthros on Great and Holy Tuesday, the Orthodox Church sings the following hymn by St. Kassiane:
O Lord, the woman who had fallen into many sins, perceiving Thy divinity, fulfilled the part of a myrrh-bearer; and with lamentations she brought sweet-smelling oil of myrrh to Thee before Thy burial. ‘Woe is me,’ she said, ‘for night surrounds me, dark and moonless, and stings my lustful passion with the love of sin. Accept the fountain of my tears, O Thou who drawest down from the clouds the waters of the sea. Incline to the groanings of my heart, O Thou who in Thine ineffable self-emptying hast bowed down the heavens. I shall kiss Thy most pure feet and wipe them with the hairs of my heads, those feet whose sound Eve heard at dusk in Paradise and hid herself for fear. Who can search out the multitude of my sins and the abyss of Thy judgments, O Saviour of my soul? Despise me not, Thine handmaiden, for Thou hast mercy without measure.

simplyorthodox:

At Bridegroom Orthros on Great and Holy Tuesday, the Orthodox Church sings the following hymn by St. Kassiane:

O Lord, the woman who had fallen into many sins, perceiving Thy divinity, fulfilled the part of a myrrh-bearer; and with lamentations she brought sweet-smelling oil of myrrh to Thee before Thy burial. ‘Woe is me,’ she said, ‘for night surrounds me, dark and moonless, and stings my lustful passion with the love of sin. Accept the fountain of my tears, O Thou who drawest down from the clouds the waters of the sea. Incline to the groanings of my heart, O Thou who in Thine ineffable self-emptying hast bowed down the heavens. I shall kiss Thy most pure feet and wipe them with the hairs of my heads, those feet whose sound Eve heard at dusk in Paradise and hid herself for fear. Who can search out the multitude of my sins and the abyss of Thy judgments, O Saviour of my soul? Despise me not, Thine handmaiden, for Thou hast mercy without measure.

(via pedestrian-palamite)